Category Archives: American Art

Art and Individuality

“What the superior man seeks is in himself; 

what the small man seeks is in others.”

― Confucius

Following World War II the relevance of individual identity in art has been disregarded. This blog intends to shed light on the continued expression of individuality by artists.

Karl Zerbe (1903 – 1972) 

[All modern artists have] “the desire to give to the object a functional beyond its naturalistic aspect to free it from its accidental surroundings, to develop and organize it within the frame of the picture into an emotional potential. In other words, the object is elevated to a symbol.” 

Karl Zerbe, Self Portrait with Clown, 1945. Encaustic, 19 1/2 x 15 1/4 inches.
Karl Zerbe, THE MASK OF HER FACE, 1948. Tempera on board, 20 x 25 3/4 inches.
Karl Zerbe, Cyprus II, 1955. Encaustic on board, 39 x 24 inches.


Balcomb Greene (1904 – 1990)


“I do not believe that art should be explicit,” …. It should be suggestive and ambiguous so that the viewer has to enter in.” 



Balcomb Greene, Gertrude III, 1958. Oil on canvas, 62 1/4 x 50 inches.
Balcomb Greene, Two figures,1970. Oil on canvas, 56 x 46 inches.



Balcomb Greene, Shadows and Sea, 1970. Oil on canvas, 61 x 55 inches.



Albert Kotin (1907 – 1980)


“As long as there are people such as Al Kotin, 

there is no danger to art.” – Alexander Calder



Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1950. Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches.
Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1954. Oil on canvas, 70 x 58 inches
Albert Kotin, Party IV, 1964. Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches.
Albert Kotin, Testigos, 1968,  Quadriptych. Oil on canvas, 104 x 63 inches.
Albert Kotin, Modesty… The Scientist, 1968, Oil on canvas, 39 3/4 x 48 inches.



Ezio Martinelli (1913-1980) 


“For myself I venerate all of that which I am forced to call , for the sake of clarity, the past, my own Western Heritage and the even older and brilliant past of the Far East and Near East and their multiple cultures. In this way I feel I pay homage to the Titan’s, both anonymous 

and known.”

Ezio Martinelli, Untitled (Abstraction), 1949. Oil on canvas, 71 x 39 inches. 
Ezio Martinelli, Untitled, 1950. Oil on canvas, 79 1/2 x 23 1/2 inches.
Ezio Martinelli, Grief, 1951. Oil on canvas, 60 x 25 inches.

Leon Golub (1922 – 2004) 

The ART news writer Amei Wallach once wrote:

“Golub was a righteous monster who reconciled painting with the unpalatable realities of his time.”

Leon Golub, The Orator IV, 1962. Oil on canvas, 37 x 30 3/4 inches

Robert Nathans (1955-2016) 


“I bring all my memories with me as I stand in front of my canvases. Here my intuition comes into play. It will sometimes take me months of working. Then, somewhere in this process of painting and observing. I would inextricably disappear. Unaware of body, time, and space when I become painting.”

Robert Nathans, The Distractive Character, 1986. Oil on wood and tree stumps, 36 x 14 inches.

Anki King (1970 – )   


“Emotions are the base of the work I make and I use paint and brushstrokes to express what I want to say, and the feeling I wish to convey. 


Painting to me is a collaborative process.

Oil paint is a live medium and if you do something with it, it does something back that you again can respond to; it is a communication. Every work I create contains figures or figurative elements. I always enjoyed the figure and I have a love relationship with it as form. It is also the most direct way I can convey my own experience and it is ultimately this experience I create out of.”

Anki King, Broken Mannequin, 2002. Oil on canvas, 39 x 36 inches.
Anki King, Fall, 2012. Oil on canvas, 54 x 74 inches.

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Joe Stefanelli, American Abstract Expressionist

Joe (Joseph) Stefanelli, American Abstract Expressionist


Joe Stefanelli (born 1921) also known as Joseph J. Stefanelli belonged to the New York School Abstract Expressionist artists whose influence and artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized around the world. New York School Abstract Expressionism, represented by Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline and others became a leading art movement of the post-World War II era.

 

Joe Stefanelli-Abstract Expressionist

New York School action painter.

Joe Stefanelli, Untitled, 1951
Oil on canvas,25 x 30 1/8 inches
Exhibited in the “9th St.” Sho, 1951

Joe Stefanelli, Wednesday, 1958
Oil on canvas, 50 x 60 inches

Joe (Joseph) Stefanelli, Whisper 1961
Oil on canvas 26 x 20 in

Joe (Joseph) Stefanelli, Once more, 1962,
Acrylic on canvas, 36 x 23 inches

Joe Stefanelli, Tucon painting #4, 1985
Acrylic on board 24 x 30 inches

Joe Stefanelli, Mythra Dialogue, 1988. 

Acrylic on canvas, 39 3/4 x 50 1/8 inches  

Joe Stefanelli, Bologna Attendants, 1989
Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 50 inches

Joe Stefanelli is represented in the book:

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Long Island Books: “New York School Abstract Expressionists: Artist’s Choice by Artists”

Long Island Books: “New York School Abstract Expressionists: Artist’s Choice by Artists”

Rose C.S. Slivka | December 14, 2000

“New York School Abstract
Expressionists: Artist’s Choice by Artists”

Edited by Marika Herskovic
New York School Press, $95

Marika Herskovic, the editor and driving force behind the book “New York School Abstract Expressionists: Artist’s Choice by Artists,” may well have hauled in the most complete roundup of the many and varied painters and sculptors who created and defined the most adventurously American art movement of the 20th century.

This lavish book presents 265 artists in 393 pages, with no less than 172 full-page reproductions and statements by 86 artists.

The New York School movement was undoubtedly the most significant in the history of American art. Taking place in downtown New York where artists worked in neighboring studios during the post World War II boom, Abstract Expressionism received visibility in artist-organized exhibits beginning with the “9th Street Show” in 1951 and continuing uptown with the annual Stable Gallery shows until 1957.

The New York School was inhabited by a variety of yet-to-be-known makers and individual styles, yet all shared the brave new art world of Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, and Mark Rothko.

The book documents not only those who made it and became world famous, but the many about whom, still, little is known. Yet they participated richly with their energy, work, and ideas in this tumultuous, generative period. The book represents them vividly, thereby ensuring that they will not be lost.

What most defined the time was its high camaraderie, a group spirit in downtown New York that had its genesis in the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression, when artists worked on government sponsored projects and murals in public spaces. The movement reached its peak in the late 1940s and early 1950s and has not been equaled since.

Ibram Lassaw Erinnys, 1954

All right reserved by the artists or by his delegates.

How Old?

Published by the New York School Press, the book has been luxuriously printed on heavy coated stock. It contains installation shots of both the “9th Street Show,” which took place in a rented loft, and the Stable Gallery on West 57th Street, together with replicas of announcements and lists of artists. The lists give ages and the numbers of times each artist showed as well as other statistical data and a complete index of artist participation in these events.

Having been around the scene at the time, I was amused to see that age is as prone to the manipulations of vanity among the men as legend would have it was among the women.

While many of the reproductions were supplied by the artists, their galleries, and collectors, an impressive number are photographs done for the book by Geoffrey Clements, who is treated as an artist in his own right, with a full-page photograph of himself and two pages of text.

This is on a par with the work of the incomparable Aaron Siskind, the photographer-collagist who influenced the painting of his time, particularly the work of Franz Kline. With two full-page reproductions, a statement from Siskind’s own writings, plus a curriculum vitae including all his solo and group exhibits, the point of his importance is certainly made clear.

A member of the Artists Club, he was the only photographer whom the artists welcomed as a participant. Otherwise, the painters of that era considered photographers on a lower plane.

It comes as a fresh surprise to see how important the East End becomes as the place that harbored Action Painting, as Abstract Expressionism was also called by its foremost critic, Harold Rosenberg, who lived in New York and in Springs.

The list of those who lived and worked on the East End, many of whom still do, numbers 53.

All the books by Marika Herskovic/New York School Press are available at:

amazon.com

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Albert Kotin American Abstract Expressionist of the 1950s

Albert Kotin American Abstract Expressionist of the 1950s

ALBERT KOTIN (1907-1980) belonged to the early generation of New York School Abstract Expressionist Artists whose artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized across the Atlantic including Paris. New York School Abstract Expressionism represented by Jackson Pollock, Willem De Kooning, Franz Kline and others became the leading art movement of the postwar era. 

Alexander Calder wrote in 1968:

“As long as there are people such as Al Kotin, there is no danger to art.”
Albert Kotin, Chinese Holiday, 1948,
Oil and enamel on canvas 36 x 22 inches
All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.
Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1950.
Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches
All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.
Albert Kotin, Spanish Dancers, 1950.
Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches
All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.
Albert Kotin Predators 1951,
Oil on canvas, 36 x 28 inches
Exhibited in the “9th St” Show, 1951All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.
Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1954.
Oil on canvas, 70 x 58 inches
Exhibited at the Hilton Promenade, 1957All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Westerly, 1957.
Oil on canvas, 69 x 79 inches
All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates..

Albert Kotin, Whispering Rain, 1957.
Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 inches.

All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, October, 1957-58.
Oil on canvas, 50 x 38 inches.
Exhibited: Grand Central Moderns, 1958All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

 

Albert Kotin, Party IV, 1964.Oil on canvas 36 x 30 inches.Exhibited: Byron Gallery, New York City, 1964 All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates. 

Albert Kotin, Head, c1968.
Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 36 inches.
All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Testigos 1968. Quadriptych.
Oil on canvas, 104 x 63 inches.
All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Modesty… The Scientist, 1968.
Oil on canvas, 39 3/4 x 48 inches
All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

 

Albert Kotin is included in the following books:





All the books may be obtained at:

 

 

amazon.com

 

 

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New York Figurative Expressionism

New York Figurative Expressionism.

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Filed under Abstract Art, Abstract Expressionism, American Art, Art, Art Books, Books, Fine Art, Post War Art, Video, Virtual Gallery

lolipuf’s photostream

Nicolas Carone, Untitled, 1956Nanno de Groot, Untitled, 1950. Oil on canvas, 52 x 59 inchesJose de Rivera, Construction #32, 1956.Gabriel Kohn, Ventura V, 1963. Wood, 28.50 inches.David Slivka, Maternity, 1951. Albaster, Hight: 14 inches.Rosemarie Beck, Zina Room VI, 1967. Oil on canvas, 34 1:4 x 28 inches.
Robert Goodnough, Sheridan Squere, 1959. Oil on board 40 x 59 7:8 inchesIrving Kriesberg Birds Alighting, 1951. Tempera on board, 32 3:4 x 30 inchesSeymour Lipton Storm Bird, 1953. nickel silver on monel. 20%22 x 35.70%22 x 11%22 (50.80cm x 90.68cm x 27.94cm) 1953 Mixed MediaDavid Hare, Giants at NIght II, 1977Paul Jenkins, October Fleet, 1959.David Hare, Cronus, 1973
Conrad MarcRelli(1913 - 2000), Collage, c.1972David Aronson (1923 - ), Ishmaelite, 1955Jules Olitski, Divine Hostage, 1973. Acrylic on canvas, 65 x 48 inch.Walter Kuhlman, Untitled, 1953Gabor Peterdi, Dunes and Dark Sea, 1983. Oil on canvas, 50 x 80 inch.Harry Weisburd, Dancer Swirling Red Skirt 3D, 2013 Watercolor on canvasboard, 11 x 14 inches.
William Littlefield, Abstract Collage. 1963William Horace Littlefield, Portrait of a Reclining Female Nude, 1935. Oil on board, 18 1:2 x 24 1:2 inchesWilliam Horace Littlefield, Untitled, 1955. Oil on canvas, 51 x 36 inchesWilliam Horace Littlefiel, The Burning Bush, 1958. Oil on canvas, 36 x 41 inchesHarry Weisburd, Earth Goddess Hill By the Sea, Pastel on heavy paper 39 x 32 inchesDennis Ashbaugh, Pope Blasts Reds Again, 1979

The artworks that I love and I am happy to share.

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American abstract expressionism

American abstract expressionism was an American post–World War II art movement. It was the first specifically American movement to achieve international influence and put New York City at the center of the western art world, a role formerly filled by Paris. Blog provides images, statements by the artists and videos.

James Brooks ( 1906 − 1992 )

Considered a first generation abstract expressionist painter, Brooks was amongst the first abstract expressionists to use staining as an important technique. According to Carter Ratcliff: ”His concern has always been to create painterly accidents of the kind that allow buried personal meanings to take on visibility.”  
James Brooks, BERL, 1956
James Brooks, BERL, 1956
Oil on canvas, 62 x 66 inchesAll rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates. 


Nicolas Carone ( 1917 − 2010 )

Nicolas Carone (June 4, 1917 – July 15, 2010) belonged to the early generation of New York School Abstract Expressionist artists whose artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized across the Atlantic, including Paris. New York School Abstract Expressionism, represented by Jackson Pollock, Willem De Kooning, Franz Kline, Conrad Marca-Relli and others became a leading art movement of the postwar era. 

Nicolas Carone, Untitled, 1957. o:c

Nicolas Carone, Untitled, 1957.
Oil on canvas, 60 x 74 inches.
All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.


Elaine de Kooning (1918 – 1989)

Elaine de Kooning (March 12, 1918 – February 1, 1989) was an Abstract Expressionist, Figurative Expressionist painter in the post-World War II era and editorial associate for Art News magazine.[1] On December 9, 1943, she married artist Willem de Kooning, who was a highly influential artist in the Abstract Expressionism movement.

Elaine de Kooning, Untitled, 1957

Elaine de Kooning, Untitled, 1957
Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches
All rights reserved by the artist or her legal delegates. 

Video: Elaine de Kooning

 

Perle Fine (1908-1988)

Perle Fine (1908–1988) was among the most prominent female artists associated with American Abstract Expressionism. She stated: ”I never thought of myself as a student or teacher, but as a painter. When I paint something I am very much aware of the future. If I feel something will not stand up 40 years from now, I am not interested in doing that kind of thing.” 

 Perle Fine Roaring Wind 1958

Perle Fine, The Roaring Wind, 1958.
Oil collage on canvas with aluminum foil, 42 x 52 1/4 inches.

Reproduced in the book:  
Books including Perle Fine: 

Video: Perle Fine Abstract Expressionism-1950s New York action painter


Albert Kotin (1907-1980)

Albert Kotin belonged to the early generation of New York School Abstract Expressionist Artists whose artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized across the Atlantic including Paris. New York School Abstract Expressionism represented by Jackson Pollock, Willem De Kooning, Franz Kline and others became the leading art movement of the postwar era.

Albert Kotin, Westerly, 1957

 Albert Kotin, Westerly, 1957
 Oil on canvas, 69 x 79 inches
 All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.
Reproduced in the book:  

Books including Albert Kotin:

  


Conrad Marca-Relli (1913 − 2000)

Conrad Marca-Relli was a New York School Abstract Expressionist artist. This period was later defined as The Abstract Expressionist Era. His monumental collages were hailed as a major art form. His works are in the collections of the leading museums of America and Europe and in private collections around the world.

Conrad Marca-Relli, Untitled, 1958 

Conrad Marca-Relli, Untitled, 1958
Oil on canvascollage on canvas, 38 x 471/2 inches
All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Reproduced in the book:
 

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